Graduate Students

Marguerite Pacheco

4th Year PhD Candidate in Biomedical Engineering

Cornell Dean’s Scholar &¬†Sloan UCEM Affiliate

NSF GRFP Fellow

Email: map476@cornell.edu

Education

B.A. in Biochemistry; Engineering, Smith College, 2019

Research

Tendinopathies are debilitating injuries and we have a very poor mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis and healing of this injury. I research the underlying mechanism of healing with the intent to optimize this function for therapeutic applications.

Personal Biography

Marguerite is from Montclair, NJ and enjoys playing soccer, dancing, and reading in her free time. She is actively involved in the Latinx Graduate Student Coalition, QGrads, and BMES outreach activities such as Girl Scout Engineering Day (GSED) and the Graduate Student School Outreach Program (GRASSHOPR).

Lainie Eisner

3rd Year PhD Student in Biomedical Engineering

Pre-doctoral Fellow, HSS-Cornell T32 Combined Engineering and Orthopaedic Training Program

Email: lee45@cornell.edu

Education

B.S.E. in Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2020

Research

Healthy tendons experience multi-scale mechanotransduction of stresses and strains from the bulk tissue-scale to the matrix- and cell- scales. However, accumulation of matrix damage and altered cell-matrix interactions may disrupt this process in fatigue injured tendon, driving abberant biological outcomes that are a hallmark of tendinopathy. Therefore, my goal is to quantify tendon’s micro-mechanical environment in our lab’s existing in vivo models of fatigue injury and therapeutic exercise, which will contribute to the development of mechanistically-informed strategies for tendon repair.

Personal Biography

Lainie (she/her) is originally from Livingston, New Jersey, a suburb of New York City. She is the current President of Cornell’s Graduate BMES chapter, having previously served as Community Engagement Co-Chair. She is also a Pre-doctoral Fellow in the Cornell-Hospital for Special Surgery Combined Engineering and Orthopaedics Training Program, an NIH T32-funded training program for trainees in the orthopaedic research field. When not in lab, Lainie enjoys theatre, sports, yoga, cooking and playing guitar.

Ben Johnston

2nd Year PhD Student in Biomedical Engineering

Email: bbj9@cornell.edu

Education

B.S. in Biomedical Engineering with minor in Computer Science, Washington University in St. Louis, 2021

Research

The early stages of chronic tendon injury are not well understood. I aim to further outline
the pathway and mechanisms by which fatigue loading and overuse leads to disease initiation and progression.

Personal Biography

Ben (he/him) is originally from LaGrange, IL, a suburb of Chicago. Ben is currently serving as a Community Engagement Co- Chair for the BMES executive board and is involved in K-12 outreach activities such as Girl Scout Engineering Day (GSED). Outside of lab Ben enjoys playing and watching sports, hiking, listening to his record collection, and reading.